Clara Deser, Senior Scientist CAS | CGD | NESL | NCAR | UCAR
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Journal of Climate (2004): Vol 17, No. 16, 3109-3124, 2004.

Supplementary Figures

Pacific Interdecadal Climate Variability: Linkages between the Tropics and North Pacific during boreal winter since 1900

Clara Deser, Adam S. Phillips, and James W. Hurrell

National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado

Figure S1. Epoch difference maps of winter SLP (contours) and associated statistical confidence levels (color shading) for high-minus-low NPI regimes (years as indicated above each panel). The contour interval is 1 hPa and negative contours are dashed. The scale for the statistical confidence levels is given in the color bar: only values exceeding 75% are shown. Significance values are computed according to a 2-tailed Student-t test, taking into account temporal autocorrelation following Zwiers and von Storch (J. Climate, 1995). A value of 95% indicates that the null hypothesis of no difference between the two epochs can be rejected at the 95% confidence level.

Figure S2. As in Fig. S1 but for epoch differences of winter precipitation (left panels; mm d-1) and associated statistical confidence levels (right panels; %) for high-minus-low NPI regimes (years as indicated above each panel).

Figure S3. As in Fig. S2 but for surface air temperature (C).

Figure S4. As in Fig. S2 but for sea surface temperature (C) over the North Pacific.

Figure S5. As in Fig. S2 but for sea surface temperature (C) over the North Pacific and Tropical Indo-Pacific based upon the Kaplan data set.

Figure S6. As in Fig. S2 but for sea surface temperature (C) over the North Pacific and Tropical Indo-Pacific based upon COADS.

Figure S7. As in Fig. S2 but for land station precipitation (mm d-1).

Figure S8. As in Fig. S2 but for marine cloudiness (oktas).

Figure S9. As in Fig. S2 but for SLP (hPa).

Updated 2/19/04