Modeling in TSS

Biome-BGC

A primary research focus for NTSG is the development and application of computer modeling tools to simulate the biological and physical processes controlling carbon, water, and nitrogen dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems.

The current code is the result of more than 15 years of development, testing, and re-development. The present model is a direct descendent of the Forest-BGC computer model. The most important differences between the Biome-BGC and Forest-BGC models is that Biome-BGC is designed to simulate ecosystem processes in both forest and non-forest biomes, and Biome-BGC has a more sophisticated treatment of several fundamental processes, including photosynthesis, allocation, and soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics. More...

Community Land Model (CLM)

The Community Land Model is the land model for the Community Earth System Model (CESM) and the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). It is a collaborative project between scienstists in the Terrestrial Sciences Section of the Climate and Global Dynamics Division (CGD) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the CESM Land Model Working Group. Other principal working groups that also contribute to the CLM are Biogeochemistry, Paleoclimate, and Climate Change and Assessment.

The model formalizes and quantifies concepts of ecological climatology. More...

Community Earth System Model (CESM)

The Community Earth System Model (CESM) is a fully-coupled, global climate model that provides state-of-the-art computer simulations of the Earth's past, present, and future climate states. More...

Changing Relief and Evolving Ecosystem Project (CREEP)

The CREEP model is a theoretical, process-response model that links ecosystem dynamics with geomorphology at the landscape scale. CREEP focuses on the interaction of soil aggregation and organic matter with downslope particle size distribution (% sand, % silt, % clay) and the formation of catena sequences, defined by Milne [1935] as a lateral distribution of chemical, physical, and biological soil properties along a hillslope. The CREEP model simulates edaphic controls on ecosystem dynamics by simulating the downslope movement of soil and nutrients while monitoring the effect on soil carbon accumulation. More...

Daymet

Interpolation and extrapolation of surface weather observations to produce high-resolution gridded daily weather for use in process modeling.

Daymet refers to both a set of methods and the resulting databases of gridded surface weather observations.

The Daymet website provides access to a 600GB database of gridded daily surface weather fields over the conterminous United States, for the period 1980-1997, with a horizontal grid resolution of 1 km.includes references describing methods, and animations of daily precipitation and temperature over the conterminous United States for 1997 are available, hosted by the Visualization and Enabling Technologies Section (VETS) of NCAR's Scientific Computing Division. More...

Land Surface Model (LSM)

The NCAR LSM (version 1) is a land surface model developed by Gordon Bonan to examine biogeophysical and biogeochemical land-atmosphere interactions, especially the effects of land surfaces on climate and atmospheric chemistry.

The model runs on a spatial grid that can range from one point to global. The model was designed for coupling to atmospheric numerical models. The model is not meant to be a detailed micrometeorological model, but rather a simplified treatment of surface fluxes that reproduces at minimal computational cost the essential characteristics of land-atmosphere interactions important for climate simulations. More...

Mountain Climate Simulator (MTCLIM)

We developed MT-CLIM to address the problems of estimating daily near-surface meteorological parameters from nearby observations. It is designed to handle the special problems encountered in mountainous terrain, but it is applicable in flat terrain as well.

MT-CLIM is a computer program that uses observations of daily maximum temperature, minimum temperature, and precipitation from one location (the "base") to estimate the temperature, precipitation, radiation, and humidity at another location (the "site"). The base and the site can be at different elevations, and can have different slopes and aspects. More...

RAMDAS

RAMDAS is a data assimilation version of the RAMS mesoscale atmosphere model, developed at Colorado State University, and is being used in TSS for assimilation of carbon dioxide concentration data to infer regional fluxes.